Surface functionalization and coatings of glass and their applications

P. Mazumder
Corning Research and Development Corporation,
United States

Keywords: glass, functional coating, adhesion, wetting, novel applications

Summary:

We live in the Glass Age1, thanks to the accelerating pace of glass innovation and its critical role in our daily lives which spans a broad range of industries including consumer electronics, telecommunications, life sciences, architecture, transportation, energy and many more. Almost daily we are inundated with news about advances in emerging and cutting-edge technologies that involve technical glass which include advanced displays, touch-screens, smart windows, smart glasses, sensors, wearables, lidars, transparent heaters, head up displays, self-cleaning windows for PVs and many others. This implies that more and more active devices are built on glass which demands special functionalities from the glass surface beyond its bulk properties. Glass surface, thus, offers an exciting playground for nanoengineering through functionalization, coating, targeted chemistry and micro-nano structuring to achieve special functional properties (wetting, adhesion, optical, chemical reactivity, tribology, charging state, adsorption, resistance to contamination, biocidal) optimized for specific applications and tasks. In this talk, we will cover various surface treatment and coating technologies we have developed over the years in Corning Research and Development to achieve highly optimized attributes; such as optimal adhesion with photoresist, optimal polarity for efficient adsorption of catalysts for metallization, optimal aspects for either temporary bonding with glass or permanent bonding with polymers, coating for dry-transfer of graphene. We will also discuss the fundamental underpinnings of each technology and the trade-offs between various attributes that guided the selection of optimal solution. 1David L. Morse and Jeffrey W. Evenson, “Welcome to the glass age”, International Journal of Applied Glass Science, 7 [4] 409–412 (2016)