Cancer Nanotechnology

Cancer Nanotechnology

Symposium Co-Chairs

Mansoor M. AmijiTranslational Cancer Nano-Medicine: Multimodal Strategies to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance
Mansoor M. Amiji
Distinguished Professor and Chairman Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Co-Director, Nanomedicine Education and Research Consortium (NERC) , Northeastern University, Boston MA
Vladimir TorchilinVladimir Torchilin
Distinguished Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences Director
Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine Bouvé College of Health Sciences

Confirmed Invited Speakers

Julia Y.  LjubimovaNano-Therapeutics for Blocking Multiple Targets: New Age for Combination Cancer Treatments
Julia Y. Ljubimova
Professor of Neurosurgery and Biomedical Sciences & Director of Nanomedicine Research Center, , Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Marianne  ManchesterVascular and tumor imaging using targeted viral nanoparticles
Marianne Manchester
Professor, University of California at San Diego
Lily YangImage-guided cancer therapy using theranostic nanoparticles
Lily Yang
Associate Professor, Emory University School of Medicine
Anil K.  SoodTherapeutic gene silencing in vivo using RNA interference
Anil K. Sood
Professor, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Peter  KuhnFluid Biopsy in Solid Tumors, how HD-CTCs can provide real-time insights into cancer
Peter Kuhn
Director and Principal Investigator; Associate Professor, Scripps Physics Oncology Center; The Scripps Research Institute
Rashid BashirTop Down Nanotechnology for Cancer Diagnostics
Rashid Bashir
Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering, University of Illinois
Marc  PorterNanoscience Strategies for the Design and Ultra Sensitive Readout of Dense Immunodiagnostic Platforms
Marc Porter
Director, Nano Institute of Utah; USTAR Professor, Departments of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Pathology, University of Utah
Demir  AkinDemir Akin
Deputy Director, Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, School of Medicine
Stanford University
Rachel  KudgusCell-Nanomaterial Interaction: Implications in Cell-Signaling and Targeted Therapy
Rachel Kudgus
Research Fellow, Mayo Clinic

Symposium Sessions

Tuesday June 19

12:30 Networking Lunch - Expo
2:45 TechConnect IP Partnering: Medical, Pharma, Personal Care
4:00 Financing Emerging Technology Commercialization
4:30 Expo Reception and Poster Session I (4:30 - 6:30)
 Cancer Nanotechnology

Wednesday June 20

8:30 Cancer Nanotech I
10:30 Cancer Nanotech II
12:30 Networking Lunch - Expo
1:00 NNI - Director’s Networking Session, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office
1:30 Exhibit and Poster Session II
 Cancer Nanotechnology
3:30 Cancer Nanotech III
5:30 TechConnect Innovation Showcase Reception
6:00 CTSI Utility Technology Challenge Awards and Reception

Thursday June 21

8:30 Cancer Nanotech IV
10:00 National Nanotechnology Initiative Triennial Review
12:30 National Innovation Showcase - Networking Lunch (available for purchase)
2:30 TechConnect Start-Up Partnering: Medical, Pharma, Personal Care
4:00 TechConnect Start-Up Partnering: Biotech, Biomaterials & Biosciences
4:00 TechConnect National Innovation Showcase, Reception & Poster Session III

Symposium Program

Tuesday June 19

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12:30Networking Lunch - ExpoExpo Hall AB
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2:45TechConnect IP Partnering: Medical, Pharma, Personal CareRoom 207
Session chair: Belen Martinez-Lopez, CaramelTech, MX, Reviewers: Schuyler Corry, Invtitrogen, Mark Wittman, Beyond Lucid Technologies, Cece Gassner, City of Boise, US
2:45NCap - NanoPorous Materials for Sustained Release
W. Daniell, NanoScape AG, DE
2:55Medical Nano-magnetic Drug Guidance
A. Harel, NanoMed Targeting Systems Inc., US
3:05Universal Optofluidic Chip for Ultra-Sensitive Raman Analysis of Liquid
S. Mak, University of Toronto, CA
3:15Next generation single dose vaccine adjuvants
S. Niewiesk, The Ohio State University, US
3:25Double Clad Fiber Coupler Allowing 3D Endoscopy
T. Martinuzzo, Univalor, CA
3:35Nanogold Assays for Direct Detection of Nucleic Acids of High Burden Infections
H. Azzazy, The American University in Cairo, EG
3:45A Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) Membrane MEMS Sensor for Flow Rate and Flow Direction Sensing, Medical and Environmental Applications
L.M. Sim, Industry Liaison Office, National University of Singapore (NUS), SG
3:55Fluorescent and Luminescent Labels for Diagnostic Imaging and Sensitive Detection of Biopolymers
S. Pillai, New Jersey Institute of Technology, US
4:05Leukocyte coping capacity: stress-testing at your fingertips
D. Sarphie, Oxford MediStress Ltd, UK
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4:00Financing Emerging Technology CommercializationRoom 203
Session chair: Tom Klein, Greenberg Traurig, US
-P. Dhingra, NanoStellar, US
-B. Segal, Lockheed Martin, US
-B. Horangic, North Bridge, US
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4:30Expo Reception and Poster Session I (4:30 - 6:30)Expo Hall AB
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Cancer Nanotechnology
-Immunodiagnosis for cervical cancer using antibody-gold nanoparticle conjugate
S. Tapaneeyakorn, C. Thepthai, N. Apiwat, T. Dharakul, National Science and Technology Development Agency, TH
-Dual gold nanoparticles-enhanced sensitivity of colorimetric immunoassay for the visual detection of cervical cancer biomarker
W. Maneeprakorn, N. Apiwat, S. Tapaneeyakorn, T. Dharakul, National Nanotechnology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, TH
-Activation of Inflammasomes by Tumor Cell Death Mediated by Gold Nanoshells
H.T. Nguyen, K.K. Tran, B. Sun, H. Shen, University of Washington, US
-Targeted Cancer Therapy by Immunoconjugated Gold-Gold Sulfide Nanoparticles Using Protein-G as a Cofactor
X.H. Sun, G.D. Zhang, D. Patel, A.M. Gobin, University of Louisville, US
-Supermagnatic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Toxicity to Mammalian Cells
K. Vig, P. Tiwari, A. Parveen, V. Rangari, S.R. Singh, Alabama State University, US
-Development of theranostic nanoparticles with the ability to break extracellular cellular matrix for enhanced nanoparticle delivery
X. Guo, W. Qian, A. Wang, L. Yang, Emory University, US

Wednesday June 20

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8:30Cancer Nanotech IGrand Ballroom A
Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
8:30Top Down Nanotechnology for Cancer Diagnostics
R. Bashir, University of Illinois, US (bio)
9:15Nanoscience Strategies for the Design and Ultra Sensitive Readout of Dense Immunodiagnostic Platforms
M. Granger, University of Utah, US (bio)
9:45Fluid Biopsy in Solid Tumors, how HD-CTCs can provide real-time insights into cancer
P. Kuhn, Scripps Physics Oncology Center; The Scripps Research Institute, US (bio)
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10:30Cancer Nanotech IIGrand Ballroom A
Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
10:30Nanomedicine for early detection of cancer and cancer therapy response monitoring
D. Akin, Stanford University, US (bio)
11:00Cell-Nanomaterial Interaction: Implications in Cell-Signaling and Targeted Therapy
R. Kudgus, Mayo Clinic, US (bio)
11:30Therapeutic gene silencing in vivo using RNA interference
A. Sood, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, US
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12:30Networking Lunch - ExpoExhibit Hall AB
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1:00NNI - Director’s Networking Session, National Nanotechnology Coordination OfficeExhibit Hall A
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1:30Exhibit and Poster Session IIExhibit Hall AB
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Cancer Nanotechnology
-Mn-Zn Ferrite and Photosensitizer Co-Loaded Cancer Theranostic Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy
S.-M. Lai, M.-D. Yang, M.-J. Tung, P.-S. Lai, National Chung Hsing University, TW
-Copper complexes loaded on nanostructured TiO2 materials as citotoxic agents of cancer cells
T. Lopez, E. Ortiz, P. Guevara, E. Gómez, Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia, MX
-Electrospun 5-fluorouracil loaded bovine serum albumin-polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers
U.E. Illangakoon, N.P. Chatterton, G.R. Williams, T. Nazir, London Metropolitan University, UK
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3:30Cancer Nanotech IIIGrand Ballroom A
Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
3:30Nano-Therapeutics for Blocking Multiple Targets: New Age for Combination Cancer Treatments
J. Ljubimova, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, US
4:00Vascular and tumor imaging using targeted viral nanoparticles
M. Manchester, University of California, San Diego, US (bio)
4:30Systemic Responses to Targeted Nanoparticle Imaging and Theranostic Agents
L. Yang, Emory University School of Medicine, US (bio)
5:00Translational Cancer Nano-Medicine: Multimodal Strategies to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance
M. Amiji, Northeastern University, US
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5:30TechConnect Innovation Showcase ReceptionExpo Hall CD
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6:00CTSI Utility Technology Challenge Awards and ReceptionExpo Theater 1
Session chair: Patti Glaza, Arsenal Venture Partners, US

Thursday June 21

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8:30Cancer Nanotech IVGrand Ballroom A
Session chair: Srinivas Iyer, Los Alamos National Laboratory, US
8:30Polymalic acid-based nanodrugs: Anti-tumor efficacy and host compatibility
E. Holler, Hui Ding, R. Patil, J. Portilla, S. Inoue, P. Gangulum, S.E. McNeil, A. Patri, M.A. Dobrovolskaia, K.L. Black, J.Y. Ljubimova, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, US
8:50EGF conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles for imaging EGFR over-expressing cells
L.J. Lucas, K.C. Hewitt, Dalhousie University, CA
9:10Efficient “green” technology to load an anticancer drug, gemcitabine monophosphate, into Iron-Trimesate MOF nanoparticles
V.R. Ruiz, V. Agostoni, H. Willaime, P. Horcajada, C. Serre, M. Lampropoulou, K. Yanakopoulous, R. Gref, Université Paris-Sud, FR
9:30VEGF-dependent mechanism of anti-angiogenic action of diamond nanoparticles in glioblastoma multiforme tumor.
M. Grodzik, E. Sawosz, M. Wierzbicki, A. Hotowy, M. Prasek, S. Jaworski, A. Chwalibog, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, PL
9:50Combined targeted hyperthermia and drug delivery with magnetic nanoparticles
T. Mitrelias, M. Tselepi, C. Barnes, V. Orel, I. Schepotin, Cavendish NanoTherapeutics, UK
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10:00National Nanotechnology Initiative Triennial ReviewGreat America 1
Session chair: Erik Svedberg, National Materials and Manufacturing, National Academies, US
10:00NNI Town Hall Meeting
E. Svedberg, National Nanotechnology Initiative, US
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12:30National Innovation Showcase - Networking Lunch (available for purchase)Expo Hall CD
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2:30TechConnect Start-Up Partnering: Medical, Pharma, Personal CareExpo Theater 2
Session chair: Paul Prendergast, Merchant & Gould, US
2:30Topical Skin Adhesive
W.B. Jeon, IntuitiveMediCorp, KR
2:40Nano-Magnetic drug targeting
A. Harel, NanoMed Targeting Systems Inc., US
2:50Leukocyte coping capacity: stress-testing at your fingertips
D. Sarphie, Oxford MediStress Ltd, US
3:00Reagent-free nanobiomimetic electrochemical sensing platform
E. Chen, Advanced Biomimetic Sensors, Inc., US
3:10Magnetic nanotechnology for targeted cancer treatment
T. Mitrelias, Cavendish NanoTherapeutics, UK
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4:00TechConnect Start-Up Partnering: Biotech, Biomaterials & BiosciencesExpo Theater 2
Session chair: Paul Prendergast, Merchant & Gould, US
4:00Laser Transmission Spectroscopy
C. Tanner, LightSprite, LLC, US
4:10Novel Shape Memory foam devices for neurovascular and other vascular applications
S. Biswas, Shape Memory Therapeutics, US
4:20Low-power, high brightness, high-resolution LED Light
S. Kang, Lux World Co., Ltd., KR
4:30Disruptive wireless silicon platform for disposable wireless healthcare sensors
S. Magar, HMicro, Inc., US
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4:00TechConnect National Innovation Showcase, Reception & Poster Session IIIExpo Hall CD

Special Symposium

Nanotechnology has the potential to have a revolutionary impact on cancer diagnosis and therapy. It is universally accepted that early detection of cancer is essential even before anatomic anomalies are visible. A major challenge in cancer diagnosis in the 21st century is to be able to determine the exact relationship between cancer biomarkers and the clinical pathology, as well as, to be able to non-invasively detect tumors at an early stage for maximum therapeutic benefit. For breast cancer, for instance, the goal of molecular imaging is to be able to accurately diagnose when the tumor mass has approximately 100-1000 cells, as opposed to the current techniques like mammography, which require more than a million cells for accurate clinical diagnosis.

In cancer therapy, targeting and localized delivery are the key challenges. To wage an effective war against cancer, we have to have the ability to selectively attack the cancer cells, while saving the normal tissue from excessive burdens of drug toxicity. However, because many anticancer drugs are designed to simply kill cancer cells, often in a semi-specific fashion, the distribution of anticancer drugs in healthy organs or tissues is especially undesirable due to the potential for severe side effects. Consequently, systemic application of these drugs often causes severe side effects in other tissues (e.g. bone marrow suppression, cardiomyopathy, neurotoxicity), which greatly limits the maximal allowable dose of the drug. In addition, rapid elimination and widespread distribution into non-targeted organs and tissues requires the administration of a drug in large quantities, which is often not economical and sometimes complicated due to non-specific toxicity. This vicious cycle of large doses and the concurrent toxicity is a major limitation of current cancer therapy. In many instances, it has been observed that the patient succumbs to the ill effects of the drug toxicity far earlier than the tumor burden.

This symposium will address the potential ways in which nanotechnology can address these challenges. Distinguished speakers will summarize the current state of the art and future barriers. Contributions are also solicited in the following topics.

  • Science and technologies for cancer diagnostic and imaging techniques using nanoparticles as reporter platforms and contrast enhancing agents;
  • Bionalaytical nanotechnology for detection of biomarkers
  • Nanoparticle platforms polymeric nanoparticles, lipid nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, and self-assembling nanosystems;
  • Synthetic chemistry required to design and optimize new strategies for nanoparticle preparation and functionalization;
  • Therapeutic targeted and intra-cellular drug and gene delivery using nanocarriers;
  • Nanoparticles for delivery of electromagnetic energy for hyperthermia and thermal ablation of tumors;
  • Theoretical modeling of nanoparticle processes in biological and medical environments, and of drug and gene delivery;
  • Combination therapies (drug and energy delivery) using nanoparticles
  • Clinical diagnosis and therapy of prostate, breast, and liver cancer.

Topics & Application Areas

  • Cancer Diagnostics
  • Cancer Biomarkers
  • Cancer Immunotherapeutics
  • Cancer Ligands
  • Drug Delivery
  • Other

Journal Submissions

Nanomedicine Journal

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine)

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine) is a newly established, international, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly. Nanomedicine publishes basic, clinical, and engineering research in the innovative field of nanomedicine. Article categories include basic nanomedicine, diagnostic nanomedicine, experimental nanomedicine, clinical nanomedicine, and engineering nanomedicine, pharmacological nanomedicine.

For consideration into the Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine journal please select the “Submit to Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine” button during the on-line submission procedure.

Nanoparticle Research

Journal of Nanoparticle Research

Selected Nanotech Proceedings papers will be reviewed and invited into a Special Issue of Journal of Nanoparticle Research. The journal disseminates knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological phenomena and processes in nanoscale structures.

For consideration into this Special Issue of Journal of Nanoparticle Research, please select the “Submit to Journal of Nanoparticle Research” button during the on-line submission procedure.

 

Sponsor & Exhibitor Opportunities

 Exhibit and Showcase
 Become a Sponsor

Please contact: Denise Lee


Program Tracks

Fabrication & Characterization

Advanced Materials

Electronics & Microsystems

Medical & Biotech

Energy & Environment

Business & Partnering

 

2012 TechConnect Corporate Acceleration Partners:

AC-NET
Applied Materials
Austin_Energy
BASF
BayerMaterialScience
bp
ConstellationEnergy
DOW
Fraunhofer TechBridge
Hitachi
Honda
IBM
Kauffman Foundation
Kodak
Lam
Lockheed Martin
MWV
nationalgrid
NortheastUtilities
novaris
Panasonic
PPG
Samsung
schlumberger
Shell_GameChanger
siemens
SK Innovation
SouthernCalEdison
Toray

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Sponsorship Opportunities: Contact Denise Lee

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